Twilight Time Round-up: A Trio of 20th Century Fox Films and Viewing Suggestions


Like many classic film fans, I’m becoming increasingly nervous about the status of physical media in our cultural landscape. A couple of years ago, I contemplated thinning my DVD/Blu-ray collection. Now I’ve decided to keep everything and save space by organizing everything into binders and making a list of my must-buy discs to start working my way through so I know I have access to my favorites.

The status of old 20th Century Fox films is of particular concern to me. Now that Disney owns the studio’s output, it has withdrawn many titles from repertoire screenings, a situation well explained in this Vulture piece. Late last year, thanks to a post by Kristen Lopez of Journeys in Classic Film in which she encouraged her readers to help keep the boutique label Twilight Time in business, I realized what a great selection of Fox titles the company offers.


Twilight Time produces their releases in limited runs of 3,000 discs, so it is wise to decide on your priorities and snap up your must haves from their collection. They have lots of sales, so it’s worth checking the site on a regular basis. I purchased TT Blu-ray releases of three 20th Century Fox productions and liked what I got. They have great picture and sound and some nice special features. My choices:




Dragonwyck (1946)

This unusual film stars Gene Tierney, Vincent Price, and Walter Huston. Based on the Gothic novel by Anya Seton, it is the story of a farm girl (Tierney) who is invited to tutor the daughter of her distant cousin (Price) a wealthy patroon who is dangerously oblivious to the changing times. Dreams of wealth and luxury turn bleak as the girl loses her innocence, but acquires valuable wisdom. This was Joseph Mankiewicz’ first directing gig and it is a solid effort, especially considering that he wasn’t too thrilled about the source material. Special features: isolated music track, audio commentary with film historian Steve Haberman and documentary filmmaker Constantine Nasr, A House of Secrets: Exploring Dragonwyck, Gene Tierney: A Shattered Portrait, Vincent Price: The Versatile Villain, Two Dragonwyck Vintage Radio Shows, original theatrical trailer.


The Best of Everything (1959) [Update: unfortunately this one is now sold out.]

I love this glossy, soapy story about a trio of women making their way in a man’s world. It goes for full glamour and melodrama and yet takes several sturdy feminist stances. Suzy Parker, Hope Lange, and all work for a successful New York publisher. They tolerate their lecherous boss played by Brian Aherne and begrudgingly admire his steely second-in-command (Joan Crawford). Special features: isolated score track, audio commentary with Rona Jaffe and Film Historian Sylvia Stoddard, Fox Movietone newsreel, and original theatrical trailer.


Bedazzled (1967)

This is the funniest pairing of British comic stars Peter Cook and Dudley Moore, as the Devil and a hapless short order cook respectively. As Moore’s dream girl, Eleanor Bron is haughtily mod and briskly independent. Moore sells his soul to the devil in his quest to get her love, but in a series of increasingly bizarre vignettes he is continually thwarted by the wily Dark Lord. A brilliant score by Moore adds humor, hip factor, and a surprising vein of melancholy. Special features: isolated music and effects track, Peter Cook and Dudley Moore on The Paul Ryan Show, A Bedazzled Conversation with Harold Ramis, original theatrical trailers.

There are so many other great films available from Twilight Time; it’s worth giving their site a long look. Here are some of the best of the Fox titles, including several that I plan to purchase for my own collection:

TT is a great source of classic Fox musicals including the delightfully trippy The Gang’s All Here (1943), the Alice Faye classic, Hello, Frisco, Hello (1943), and Betty Grable's Pin Up Girl (1944).


Some solid crime/film noir titles: The Detective (1968), Pretty Poison  (1968), Black Widow (1954), Inferno 3D (1953),Kiss of Death (1947), John Alton box set 


Classic dramas to check out: Two for the Road (1967), Whirlpool (1949),The Revolt of Mamie Stover (1956), Cinderella Liberty (1973)


This is also a great place to snap up the light-hearted Audrey Hepburn and Peter O'Toole caper How to Steal a Million (1966)


More TT titles from other studios that I highly recommend: Raw Deal (1948),  The Killer is Loose (1956), I Want to Live! (1958), Suddenly, Last Summer (1959), The Crimson Kimono (1959), My Sister Eileen (1955), Chilly Scenes of Winter (1979), Model Shop (1969), Cutter’s Way (1981)


I hope Twilight Time sticks around for a long time. They have a great catalog and I’m very happy with the quality of their releases.






2 comments:

Terence Towles Canote said...

Dragonwyck has one of my favourite Vincent Price performances of all time. I know he is a well-loved horror icon, but it is sad that he didn't get to do more straight-forward drama later in his career. And I do love Bedazzled!

KC said...

Yes! Price is so disturbing in this film. It's a truly modern performance too. I've loved Bedazzled ever since I saw it on TV when I was in high school. The music is amazing.

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